The Violent Offences Compensation Fund gives financial compensation to people who have become a victim of a violent crime resulting in serious psychological or physical injuries.

By compensating the damages suffered, the Compensation Fund acknowledges that the victims have been wronged. In this way, the Compensation fund contributes to restore confidence.

Are you a victim of a violent crime? Did you suffer injuries as a result? Or did a close relative of yours die as a result of an intentional violent crime? If so, then you can file an application for compensation with the Violent Offences Compensation Fund.

This is partial compensation for your injuries (pain and suffering) and for any financial damages you suffered, such as medical expenses or a loss of income due to incapacity for work.

In order to be entitled to compensation, you have to meet certain conditions: see below. An explanation of the conditions is added to the questions. If you are having doubts or further questions, please call the Compensation Fund: (070) 414 2000.

Frequently asked question

  • Frequently asked question
    • Are you a victim of an intentional violent crime?

      An intentional violent crime is a crime in which intentional violence was used against you or in which you were threatened with violence. For example: robbery, assault or rape.

    • Do you have serious physical or psychological injuries?

      You need to have incurred serious physical and/or psychological injuries as a result of the violent crime. According to the Compensation Fund, serious injuries are injuries with long-term or lasting medical effects.

      Some examples are: a disfiguring facial scar, fracture of an arm or leg, the loss of an eye or a post-traumatic stress disorder. Check the list of injuries for an overview of the injuries that are considered to be serious by the Compensation Fund.

    • Was the violent crime committed in the Netherlands?

      The violent crime must have been committed in the Netherlands. Your nationality (or that of your close relative) is not relevant. You also do not have to live in the Netherlands to be able to file an application. For further information, see our policy manual.

      Were you a victim of a violent crime in one of the EU-countries after 1 January 2006? If so, then you can file an application with the Dutch Compensation Fund for a payment from the compensation fund in the country in which you became a victim.

    • Did you or your close relative take part in the violent crime?

      When you have taken part in the violent crimeit may have consequences for your application. If, for instance, you were the first to use violence, you have challenged somebody or if you took part in criminal activities, then you yourself are (partly) to blame for the damage resulting from the violent crime. In these cases you may not get (full) compensation.

      However, if you were involved in an act of violence because you were helping a fellow citizen who was being assaulted, then you are not likely to be held accountable.

      If you file an application as a surviving relative, your relative must not have contributed to the violent crime. If it is established that your relative contributed to the violent crime, you will be denied compensation.

    • Were the damages compensated in any other way?

      The Compensation Fundwill pay compensation if your damages were not compensated in any other way. Did you, for instance, receive compensation from the perpetrator or an insurance company? If so, then the Compensation Fund may deduct this amount from the payment.

      If your damages were fully compensated, then the Compensation Fund, in principle, will not pay any compensation. You do not have to wait with filing the application until you know whether you get compensated by another party.

      If you receive a payment from the Compensation Fund, and afterwards from the perpetrator, for instance, you must report this to the Compensation Fund. The Compensation Fund will then determine whether this payment must be settled with (part of) the payment you received from the Compensation Fund. For further information, see our policy manual.

    • Did you file the application within a period of ten years after the violent crime took place, or after death?

      You must file your application within a period of ten years after the violent crime was committed, or after your relative died. It is possible that you are not able to file your application in this period of time. In that event, let us know the reason for the delay. We will then see if we can still handle your application.

      It is not possible to file an application if the violent crime happened before 1 January 1973.

Conditions for for obtaining compensation

  • Are you a victim of an intentional violent crime?

    An intentional violent crime is a crime in which intentional violence was used against you or in which you were threatened with violence. For example: robbery, assault or rape.

  • Do you have serious physical or psychological injuries?

    You need to have incurred serious physical and/or psychological injuries as a result of the violent crime. According to the Compensation Fund, serious injuries are injuries with long-term or lasting medical effects.

    Some examples are: a disfiguring facial scar, fracture of an arm or leg, the loss of an eye or a post-traumatic stress disorder. Check the list of injuries for an overview of the injuries that are considered to be serious by the Compensation Fund.

  • Was the violent crime committed in the Netherlands?

    The violent crime must have been committed in the Netherlands. Your nationality (or that of your close relative) is not relevant. You also do not have to live in the Netherlands to be able to file an application. For further information, see our policy manual.

    Were you a victim of a violent crime in one of the EU-countries after 1 January 2006? If so, then you can file an application with the Dutch Compensation Fund for a payment from the compensation fund in the country in which you became a victim.

  • Did you or your close relative take part in the violent crime?

    When you have taken part in the violent crimeit may have consequences for your application. If, for instance, you were the first to use violence, you have challenged somebody or if you took part in criminal activities, then you yourself are (partly) to blame for the damage resulting from the violent crime. In these cases you may not get (full) compensation.

    However, if you were involved in an act of violence because you were helping a fellow citizen who was being assaulted, then you are not likely to be held accountable.

    If you file an application as a surviving relative, your relative must not have contributed to the violent crime. If it is established that your relative contributed to the violent crime, you will be denied compensation.

  • Were the damages compensated in any other way?

    The Compensation Fundwill pay compensation if your damages were not compensated in any other way. Did you, for instance, receive compensation from the perpetrator or an insurance company? If so, then the Compensation Fund may deduct this amount from the payment.

    If your damages were fully compensated, then the Compensation Fund, in principle, will not pay any compensation. You do not have to wait with filing the application until you know whether you get compensated by another party.

    If you receive a payment from the Compensation Fund, and afterwards from the perpetrator, for instance, you must report this to the Compensation Fund. The Compensation Fund will then determine whether this payment must be settled with (part of) the payment you received from the Compensation Fund. For further information, see our policy manual.

  • Did you file the application within a period of ten years after the violent crime took place, or after death?

    You must file your application within a period of ten years after the violent crime was committed, or after your relative died. It is possible that you are not able to file your application in this period of time. In that event, let us know the reason for the delay. We will then see if we can still handle your application.

    It is not possible to file an application if the violent crime happened before 1 January 1973.